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The Palace Central Heater

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ASL's latest innovation is the Palace Central Heater, or PCH for short. With a wide temperature range, this MET-certified heater will keep your animal companions warm and comfortable year-round! The Palace Central Heater will keep this friend warm in the winter. We are excited to finally officially introduce you to the Palace Central Heater! The PCH is designed exclusively for the Dog Palace and the CRB Palace. The PCH comes with two mounting brackets that latch perfectly onto the triangular window frame of each house. It is too big to fit on the DP Hunter, but ASL's Floor Heater fits the DP Hunter just fine. And unlike the floor heater, the PCH heats the whole house. The PCH features a digital thermostat and a remote control to alter the temperature from a distance in 5 degree increments. The temperature range is a cozy 50-70 degrees Fahrenheit. We recommend going no higher than 65-70 degrees depending on your dog's coat. Fluffy dogs are going to retain heat better than sh

Reading Your Dog's Body Language

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Dog body language is important for anyone who may come across a dog to know, and especially dog owners. It's a  diverse range of species-common behaviors that indicates how a dog is feeling at any given time. Nonverbal communication is pretty much what we've got when it comes to animals, and it's an important part of responsible dog caretaking. If you want to know what your canine pal is feeling, read on. You might be barking up the wrong tree if you're not sure what your dog is trying to say. Tail Did you know that tail wagging doesn't always mean a dog is happy? A wagging tail means a dog is emotionally excited, not necessarily in a positive way. The speed and direction of the tail wag can tell you a lot about what your dog is feeling, as well as the overall position of the tail relative to the ground. The faster the tail is wagging, the more emotionally excited a canine is. A calm, relaxed dog might wag their tail slowly from side to side when greeting someone, b

Saint Roch, the Patron Saint of Dogs

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Saint Roch, the patron Saint of Dogs, led a fascinating life. Read all about his life and deeds to learn about why this saint is associated with dogs. The painting "Saint Roch and the Angel" (17th century) by Claude Simpol. Public domain Saint Roch, also known as Saint Rocco, was born in Montpellier, France, in 1295. He was born into the noble family of the governor, St. Roch's father. Roch was his parents' only son, born with a deep red birthmark on his chest in the shape of a cross. This birthmark was a sign that the Virgin Mary had heard his mother's prayers (she had struggled with infertility). Roch was a fastidiously religious child who fasted twice a week, just like his devout mother. When Roch's parents died, he was merely twenty years old, and he didn't want to be the governor. Roch gave his inheritance to the poor and the title of governor to his uncle, beginning a new life as a mendicant pilgrim (one who relies on alms and begging to survive). Fa

How Do Insulated Dog Houses Work?

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Have you ever wondered how exactly insulation works? Sure, it keeps stuff cooler when it's warm and warmer when it's cold, but why? Read on to find out how exactly the insulation in our dog houses works. Our newest palace design, the Colossal Round Barn. To understand insulation, you must first understand heat flow. Heat flow occurs in three main ways: conduction, which is how heat moves through materials (like when you touch a cast iron skillet that's been on the stove for awhile); convection, or the way heat circulates through liquids and gases (like when you're boiling water, and the water on the bottom of the pan closest to the heat source gets warm, so it rises, and is replaced with the cooler water from the top, and the cycle goes on); and radiation, where the source heats anything in its path that absorbs energy (like when you warm your hands over a fire). Graphic from here Common insulation materials often focus on slowing conductive heat flow, and to a lesser e

How to Help Your Dog Get Through the Fireworks

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Do fireworks make your dog pace, cower, whine, or tremble? Your dog isn't alone    around 45% of dogs are terrified of fireworks, according to a study published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science . Your dog doesn't have to be afraid, though    there is an abundance of ways you can help your dog cope with sound aversion. Photo by Suvan Chowdhury from Pexels In the United States, many people observe July 4th as a day of celebrating their country and its independence, and fireworks have been a big part of the traditional celebrations ever since the first anniversary of Independence Day in 1777. Unfortunately, many animal shelters report that their busiest days are July 4th and July 5th, and this isn't a coincidence. Shelters end up being flooded with panicked pets who bolted away from their families in fear, as well as worried humans trying to find their animal companions. For more information on pet safety and how to find lost pets, check out our blog post about  Petco Love

Solar Powered Doghouse Exhaust Fans--How Do They Work?

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Solar Powered Doghouse Exhaust Fans Dog Palace Solar Exhaust Fan kit. Q : How does solar power work? A : Solar panels capture the sun's energy and use it to make electricity. The sun releases energy called photons, and the photons travel to earth. When photons hit a solar cell (solar panels are made up of lots of solar cells), electrons are knocked loose from the photons' atoms. The electrical circuits formed by the solar cells generate electricity when the loose electrons flow through them. The silicon solar cells are able to make electrical circuits because they have positive and negative sides, just like a battery--this in and of itself creates an electric field. When conductors (objects or materials that allow the flow of electrical charge; commonly metal) are attached to each side of the solar cell, that forms the electrical circuit for the loose electrons to flow through! Science is wild. Now, if you're really into understanding how this works, read on! If you got wh

How do Search and Rescue Dogs Work?

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Ever wondered why dogs are the animals used for search and rescue operations? What is it about their noses that makes them unique? Just what situations do they work in, exactly? Read on to learn the answers to these questions (and a fair bit more)! Photo credit: Peter Hershey  (Stocksnap) Search and Rescue Dogs (SAR dogs) are employed by humans for a wide variety of tasks: they can help find people who are lost in the wilderness, patients who have wandered away from a care facility, or humans stuck in debris after a natural disaster like an earthquake, or snow after an avalanche. These trained dogs work well under pressure and have saved countless lives, well-earning the title of "heroes". Some suggest that a single SAR dog can do the work of 20-30 human searchers. You've probably heard that dogs have an amazing sense of smell, but do you know why? Dogs have over 100 million (some studies suggest between 125-300 million) sensory receptor sites in their nasal cavities (whi