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Meet the ASL Spokes-animals: Hank Atkison!

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Welcome to the first piece in a series of bios about the Spokes-animals of ASL Solutions! Hank Atkison Hank is beautiful, simply put. Hank is the Head Spokesdog for ASL Solutions, and he loves his job. He's honored to take on the family business from the former Head Spokesdog, Bessy. Hank is a loving, klutzy, and sweet bloodhound who was born in late 2017 and adopted by his family in early 2018. Hank has black and tan coloring and long, long ears. When Hank was a puppy, he actually used to trip over his ears! His registered name is Sir Hank E. Pank, because one of the older humans he knew used to call him Hanky Panky    he’s known to have a mischievous streak. Hank’s humans adopted him because one of the humans’ grandfathers had a bloodhound when he was growing up, and he just knew he wanted to live with and love another hound dog. Hank was born in Kentucky, and currently resides in Illinois. Hank is an energetic dog much of the time, but on his lazy days, he can be found sleeping

Cats and Scratching: Why it's Necessary and What You Can Do About it

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If it exists, a cat has scratched it. If you live with a cat, you probably know this well. From laundry baskets to toilet paper, yoga mats to shoes, canvas bins to mattresses, rugs to carpeted stairs, wooden furniture to curtains; cats love sinking their claws into humans' stuff. But, it's actually healthy! Runa adores the texture of yoga mats. It's just *scratch* so *scrape* satisfying! But a yoga mat is a little harder to use when there's a cat lying on it, pulling little chunks off. Why Cats Scratch Scratching is healthy and natural for cats to do--they don't do it to be destructive. Cats have scent glands on their paws, so they sometimes scratch to leave a visual mark as well as a scent. This is used for communication among cats, especially for territory-marking. Scratching also helps cats to keep their claws healthy by removing the dead outer layer. It's also a great way for cats to stretch and flex their feet and claws, and it's normal, instinctive beh

Meet the ASL Product Models: Rosie Nuxoll!

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This is the sixth blog in our series of 'Meet the ASL Product Models' by our intern, Skye Isabella Rose Iwanski. Rosie Nuxoll Rosie smiling for the camera. Rosie Nuxoll is a sweet, shy, playful golden doodle from a farm in Illinois. Rosie's playful spunk made her stand out to her soon-to-be-family, and they fell in love. The farmer who was selling the puppies had dressed them up in little costumes to tell them apart, and Rosie was dressed as Cinderella, complete with a flouncy little cape. Rosie was born in July of 2019 and adopted by her family in September of that year, shortly after her sister Lyla was adopted by the same family. The sisters are best friends, and were from a litter of nine puppies. Rosie was named after the grandmothers of one of her humans, who were both named Rose. Lyla and Rosie adorably cuddling together. Besides her sister Lyla, Rosie's best friend is one of her humans, Grant. Rosie will do anything for Grant, and as soon as he walks in the room

Dogs and Chewing: Why it's Necessary and What You Can Do About it

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If you've ever lived with a dog before, you have probably also had something destroyed by your furry friend. A deck of cards, a book, a pair of headphones, a couch, electrical cords, a door, a rug, your best shoes, toilet paper rolls--you name it, a dog's definitely chewed on it. Ever wonder why, though? It's actually really important for them to chew! Give a Hank a box, and he'll chew for 5 minutes. Why Dogs Chew: So why do dogs chew so much in the first place? Well, it's actually good and healthy for a dog to chew! Puppies chew a lot to relieve the pain of teething, much like human babies. We give little rubbery rings to babies to safely chew on, so you can see how puppies would need something similar. Their teeth are a little different, so a chew toy for a puppy might look a little different than a chew toy for a human baby. Dogs older than puppies chew to keep their jaws strong and their gums and teeth healthy. It's a natural way for them to keep up their de

Meet the ASL Product Models: Daisy Ochs!

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  This is the fifth blog in our series 'Meet the ASL Product Models' by our intern, Skye Isabella Rose Iwanski. Daisy Ochs Daisy out and about. When Daisy Ochs's humans saw her for the first time, she was five months old and living in a barn. She was a little wild, and her beauty, striking. Her humans fell in love with her because of the way she looked at them with her big, sad-looking St. Bernard eyes. She grew from a playful puppy into a playful adult, and her impressive size makes her appear an imposing guard dog, though she's secretly easy to startle. She's been a lap dog from day one, and that hasn't changed with her age or her exponential increase in size. She's three years old and full of unique quirks and charm. Daisy relaxing on the carpet, one paw resting on her head. When her humans lay down, she sits on their heads. That's also one of the places she thinks she needs to sleep. She starts off the night by sleeping at the foot of their bed, but

Debunking "Dangerous Breed" Stigma

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Have you ever heard about certain breeds of dog being more dangerous than others? Well, some breeds of dog experience negative judgement based on misinformation, which has serious consequences for those dogs and for their caretakers. But, there is hope! Read on to learn more about breed stigma. Debunking "Dangerous Breed" Stigma The angelic, perfect face of the beautiful Dessa. What is breed stigma? The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines stigma as "a mark of shame or discredit". It is also known as a negative preconception surrounding a group of people, animals, places, or things. So when we say "breed stigma" in reference to dogs, we mean to refer to the negative stereotypes that surround certain breeds of dog. Much breed stigma revolves around the apparently inherent danger, aggressiveness, and vicious disposition of certain breeds of dog, which is factually incorrect and serves to villainize innocent animals. The National Canine Research Council, the Ce